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Carrying On: Untangling the Art From the Artist

Carrying On: Untangling the Art From the Artist

I have always been in love with movies. Beautiful, gritty, or suspenseful, it doesn’t matter. When done right, a film has the power to place me in a different world, a world more dazzling, more terrifying, or more outlandish than the one in which I reside. A soaring piece of music, a particularly cutting dialogue…

Dividing Lines: Reflections on the Inherent Violence of Borders

Dividing Lines: Reflections on the Inherent Violence of Borders

A powerful scene (and there are many) in Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men goes something like this. In 2027, a xenophobic and nationalist Britain regularly raids entire housing complexes in London, rounding up asylum seekers in cages. The police spot a car belonging to a resistance group. They see a dead woman sitting shotgun, blood…

And Now for Something Different: How Many Students Are From New Jersey?

And Now for Something Different: How Many Students Are From New Jersey?

Georgetown says it is committed to the geographic diversity of its undergraduate student body. Anecdotal experience has supported this; my classmates hail from parts of the country and the world I had never been exposed to before, undeniably enhancing my experience as a student. But just how successfully does Georgetown maintain this commitment? We certainly…

Hidden Hegemony: The Twisted Narratives of “American Carnage”

Hidden Hegemony: The Twisted Narratives of “American Carnage”

Over the course of the transition period and during the preliminary days of his presidency, Donald Trump has maintained much of the rhetoric that propelled him to the White House. This narrative has emphasized the theme of American desolation, particularly in urban, inner-city America, which either existed under or was perpetuated by the Obama Administration….

Open Access: “But What About Overdiagnosis?”

Open Access: “But What About Overdiagnosis?”

Is mental illness overdiagnosed? I’m not going to answer that question. The idea that we’re mistakenly diagnosing people who don’t have mental illnesses is more harmful than many realize. These days, it’s difficult to have a conversation about mental health without someone bringing up the problem of overdiagnosis. The gist of the “overdiagnosis problem” is…

Carrying On: Feminism in the Age of Trump

Carrying On: Feminism in the Age of Trump

Women and men of all ages and ethnic backgrounds wearing pink hats with pointed, ear-like appendages on either side carried signs emblazoned with clever slogans: “There is no Planet B,” “Grab ‘em by the patriarchy,” “Let’s talk about the elephant in the womb,” and “I’ve seen smarter cabinets at Ikea.” Celebrities gave speeches. Marchers took…

The Privilege of Forgetting

The Privilege of Forgetting

I am nine months old when I fly first class for the first—and, at the time of this writing—only time in my life. My commuter dad amassed enough frequent flier points to score three deluxe seats on the second floor of a double-decker plane flying from Hong Kong International to JFK. Tragically, my paid-for seat…

Hidden Hegemony: Progress and Regression, Juxtaposed

Hidden Hegemony: Progress and Regression, Juxtaposed

Last week, we at Georgetown celebrated—insofar as cancelling classes on Monday and Friday serves as a barometer for celebration—a juxtaposition of historical forces personified in two men. This is a reality of the stagnation, perhaps even regression, of racial politics in this country. The symbolism of this celebratory nexus—Martin Luther King Jr.’s remarkable contribution to…

Open Access: The Harm in Romanticizing Mental Illnesses

Open Access: The Harm in Romanticizing Mental Illnesses

Acceptance of mental illness has come really far. We’re having open and honest conversations about what it feels like to live with depression or anxiety, and people who haven’t experienced these illnesses personally are listening and trying to understand those who have. “I’m having a hard day with my mental illness” is viewed as an…

Open Access: Party Culture and Success in a World With Mental Illness

Open Access: Party Culture and Success in a World With Mental Illness

One of the main reasons I chose to attend Georgetown was that our lack of sororities and fraternities means campus social life revolves around student groups. In theory, this means that everyone makes friends with people they share interests with and no one is excluded if they choose not to participate in one thing or the other. As I’ve been…

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