Editorials

It isn’t a child yet

By:
05/03/2001

Last Thursday, with support from the Bush White House, Representatives in the House passed a bill granting legal protection to the human fetus by establishing new criminal penalties for anyone who injures or harms a fetus while committing another federal offense. The bill is known as the Unborn Victims of Violence Act.

Theme-based policy

By:
04/26/2001

President Bush’s press secretary, Ari Fleischer, told reporters last week that the President had declared an environmental “theme week,” not unlike his earlier “theme weeks” related to spirituality and the economy. This Marriott Food Services-approach to governance does have its benefits for the nation; as part of this “theme week,” the President announced a series…

Anti-Free Trader Joes

By:
04/26/2001

What do whales, ozone, sweatshop workers and the prison industrial complex have in common? More than you might think. Protestors at a recent free trade summit in Quebec drew fire for lacking a coherent message. The protestors, critics said, had only one thing in common: protesting. The critics point to protestors who don’t really know…

Zoned out

By:
04/26/2001

In any healthy relationship, there must be give-and-take, yielding and proceeding. In its March 29 decision not to raise Georgetown’s enrollment above the 1990 cap of 5,627 undergraduate students, the Board of Zoning Adjustment revealed its unwillingness to yield and, consequently, its refusal to enter into a partnership with an institution that has an essential…

Back in the U.S.S.R.?

By:
04/19/2001

In the wake of the recent “incident” in the South China Sea, we are afforded the opportunity to look back upon what happened, what could have been done differently and what lessons we should take away from this regarding an overarching philosophy of foreign policy in the new Bush administration. To date, the policy of the Bush White House has been largely reactive.

Water, water, everywhere

By:
04/19/2001

Late last month, the Environmental Protection Agency decided to reverse a drinking-water regulation imposed in the last days of the Clinton administration that would have reduced by 80 percent the permissible levels of arsenic, a known carcinogen, in drinking water supplies. The Bush administration rejected the new standards in favor of retaining archaic arsenic regulations that were established in 1942. President George Bush’s rejection of the new drinking water standards is only the latest development in the Bush administration’s assault on the environment.

Adios, amigo

By:
04/19/2001

Let us be the latest voice to bemoan the loss of Joey Ramone, who died of cancer on Sunday at age 49. Ramone will be forever remembered as the lead singer of seminal New York City punk band, The Ramones, who could fairly be credited with introducing the sound of punk rock to the world and thereby changing the course of popular music history forever. It wasn’t that the members of The Ramones were particularly talented, but they were the catalysts that launched punk rock into the mainstream.

Adding it all up

By:
04/05/2001

An advertisement for pizza in a campus publication is unexceptional. But an ad espousing a particular political opinion almost instantaneously provokes controversy, especially when that opinion runs counter to the oft-assumed liberal credentials of the college press corps. To censor ads that contain political content is seemingly to negate the First Amendment right to freedom of speech, but to publish such ads is seemingly to implicitly endorse the views contained therein. For a radical-turned-reactionary looking to force the hand of college newspaper editors nationwide, it has all the makings of a brilliantly spun Catch-22: Publish and perish in the court of public opinion, or cut the ad and capitulate to the pretense that the press has a moral obligation to shield its readers from potentially inflammatory material.

Smoke screens

By:
04/05/2001

In October 1998, an amendment, called the Drug-Free Student Aid Provision, was passed as part of the Higher Education Act that prohibits any college applicant with an adult drug conviction from receiving federal financial aid. Last year, Reps. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and Bobby Scott (D-Va.) pushed bills to repeal this amendment that failed, and Frank wants to reintroduce the repeal bill this spring.

Fully committed

By:
04/05/2001

Georgetown University has made millions licensing its name to clothing manufacturers. Georgetown clothing is produced in factories around the world and under varying conditions. Clearly, Georgetown has received money for clothing produced in violation of both labor laws and ethical standards.

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