Run ’til you’re pretty

By:
09/09/2004

I’m trying to get bigger using creatine and protein shakes, but I don’t want to be the next Ultimate Warrior. What are some pros and con’s of these shakes and how often should I take it?-The best looking Southwest Quad RA

All you hear about in the gym these days is how much you can bench, and when you hear the Ultimate Warrior say he’s not taking supplements you want to start taking them by the bottle. While creatine and protein shakes speed up the process of getting large and in charge these supplements should only compose 10 to 15 percent of your diet. The rest should comprise of fats (25 to 30 percent) and carbohydrates (60 to 65 percent) to provide energy. Fat is the most central source of energy, and your body breaks down carbohydrates in a way that muscles love most. Protein is only a good source of energy if there is too little coming from your fats and carbohydrates. When you consume too much protein, it ends up being converted to fat.

This is why the Ultimate Warrior isn’t on TV anymore; all of his muscle build up from steroids has turned to fat and now he has a bad case of the man boobs. My advice to you is to eat right and exercise three to four times a week. Creatine will yield some quick results but it is uncertain what its long-term effects will be. If you are set on taking it, it’s best to go with this formula: 0.7 to 1.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. If you go over 1.8 you risk getting gout like symptoms and increased body fat, not to mention a career as short as the Ultimate Warrior.

I joined a gym over the summer but I didn’t have enough time to go everyday because of work so I stopped. What are some quick time saving exercises I can do from home to stay in decent shape and fit into my jeans for happy hour drinks?- Kristin from Subway

If you need to workout from home, any form of aerobics can keep you in shape. Just look at Jane Fonda or Richard Simmons. Scratch that, nobody should ever have to think of Richard Simmons. Still, many forms of aerobics can be helpful, whether its cycling, jogging, swimming, stair stepping or just getting a tape to watch and mimic. You should do it from a minimum of three times per week for 20 minutes to a maximum of five times a week for 30 to 50 minutes each time (depending on how much you have to work). By doing some aerobic exercises, you can increase your ability to burn stored body fat, increase your oxygen intake, reduce your risk of vascular disease and improve your body image/self-esteem. The cool part is that you can do some stair stepping, skating or dancing to mix it up and do it all from home.

William Buckingham is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences and is a personal trainer. He can be reached at GeorgetownVoice.com

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