Voices

Voices is the Op-Ed and personal essay section of The Georgetown Voice. It features the real narratives of diverse students from nearly every corner on campus, seeking to tell some of the incredibly important and yet oft-unheard stories that affect life in and out of Georgetown.


Voices

Gamer Vote: The rise of technology-driven politics

While it has largely been Democratic campaigns pursuing Gamer Vote as a political strategy, there is huge potential for campaigns to expand their base by reaching this still largely untapped voter segment

Voices

Undergraduates have embraced social media as a platform to comment on Israel and Palestine. Should we?

I have also come to the realization that while social media activism can be problematic by lending credence to absolutist viewpoints, social media is often the only tool for activism among disenfranchised and minority opinion groups.

Voices

College, Interrupted: A reflection on my pandemic gap year

The pre-pandemic normal encouraged students to work through burnout and prioritize arbitrary academic and professional pressures over our wellbeing. While it seems that many students are still enamored by this lifestyle, I’m not sure that I can handle a desperate cling to the old normal when it was harmful in the first place.

Voices

A Third Start: Reflections from pandemic transfer students

The 2020 transfer class has already experienced Georgetown for a year but is just now finding their permanent place on the Hilltop.

Voices

Why grief is more than a five-step process

The five stages of grief do not explain that every holiday and special occasion will be bittersweet because the feeling of loss simply does not end. They do not explain that talking is not the only way to process your emotions of grief, or that your love for the person who died cannot be changed by resuming your life. We need a new perception of grief; one that does not exclude what makes grief idiosyncratic

Voices

In the Future, Jobs Will Make Fun of You for Applying

What us young professionals need is a sense of unity; after all, we are quite literally the future, without us these businesses will wither. So keep applying, put your best foot forward and give it your all everytime.

Voices

Breaking Down Imposter Syndrome

While imposter syndrome is commonly associated with academics, the feeling of estrangement extends beyond the classroom, as imposter syndrome permeates clubs and social settings.

Voices

Unfollow Chunky the Panda

And reject the willful ignorance and exclusion it stands for.

Digital Issue

Why my OCD diagnosis meant so much

At this point, it was pretty clear that there really was something different about the way my brain worked. Or at least, there had better be.

Voices

When Neutrality Isn’t Enough: Exploring multipartiality in the classroom

Implementing multipartiality provides participants with a consideration of counter narratives, as well as a consideration of why these perspectives are so often suppressed. This question of “why?” provides insight as to the function of larger structures, including the education system itself. 

Voices

@AOC is Live Now: How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez can steer local political engagement

AOC has brilliantly used Instagram to connect with and galvanize the masses on national issues. Local engagement should be spotlighted, too.

Voices

Why Democrats could lose the filibuster battle

Democrats face a tough dilemma on Capitol Hill. Though they control Congress and the presidency, the Senate’s filibuster rules limit their ability to pass a progressive agenda. While Democrats have undertaken an extensive campaign against these rules, this campaign itself is unlikely to kill the filibuster. But by simply calling for the filibuster’s end, Democrats have already doomed it.

Voices

Vaccinating the world is more than a moral imperative

With their national vaccine campaigns well underway, it’s time the U.S. and other Western countries start to fulfill their responsibility to vaccinate the rest of the world. It’s a moral imperative, as well as a public health necessity.

Voices

Gay Men Still Can’t Easily Donate Blood: Why the FDA should end their discriminatory deferral

To be clear, I am not advocating for a complete overhaul of the pre-blood donation screening procedure for every individual; rather, I am looking for more nuance when it comes to screening homosexual and bisexual men.

Voices

On What We Are Missing: Grieving the loss of senior year

All of the usual nostalgia of senior year “lasts” is further amplified because there are hardly any chances to make new memories anymore—just extra hours to ruminate on former versions of ourselves that we left behind long ago.

Voices

Bridgerton proves that color-conscious casting alone is not good enough

Bridgerton sits somewhere in the middle of the spectrum, not really committed to color-conscious casting, but not color-blind either. The way that race fits into the storyline seems to have been an afterthought. The conversation, which attributed the diversity of the society to love conquering prejudice, was so shallow that I wish they hadn’t included it.

Voices

Sneaker Flipping: Inclusive community before profit

Sneaker flipping enables the use of technology to exploit a slow-moving system. Now beyond innovative, the practice has become inequitable.

Voices

Misery is tired of company

It almost seems impossible, really, that most of the time I forget about this thing that has sat heavy in my chest for 17 years. There’s no other aspect of my life that is simultaneously so crucial to my internal narrative, and yet so distanced from it. Most days, it feels like my ED belongs to someone else—or millions of someone else's—more than it does to me.

Voices

Infographic Wars: How Instagram aestheticizes injustice

In response to Asian-American racism and hate, Allie Cho explores the harms of infographics. The transient, aesthetically pleasing, and performative nature of these posts attempt to solve systematic injustice and are ultimately unproductive and unsuccessful.

Voices

With a snap of my fingers

I got to Georgetown, and right from the beginning, I felt—yet again—the need to prove myself. Only one semester into college I realized that my idea of accomplishment, an idea based on being more successful than everyone around me, just is not sustainable.