Opinion



Opinion

An open letter to my fellow white friends: Let’s talk about race.

Speaking out against racism is more than an action. It is a process of recognizing the ways in which white people contribute to and benefit from institutional and societal racism. It is a process of realizing feeling guilty is a privilege—that Black people and other people of color have been living with the effects of this racism for their entire lives. 

Voices

To support vulnerable students, a tuition decrease is not the answer

By supporting a tuition decrease, we put countless faculty and staff members at risk. We deplete already-scant resources that help level the academic and social playing field for socioeconomically disadvantaged students like myself who depend on tuition revenues for funding. Ultimately, we risk undoing much of the progress made over the last five decades towards creating a more diverse and inclusive Georgetown community.  

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: How COVID-19 affects international graduate students

"In light of these struggles, the COVID-19 pandemic has made me question the university’s real commitment to the global character it parades around."

Editorials

Address Racism in Journalism

As global demonstrations against racial injustice continue into their fourth week, the breadth of inequities being protested against has expanded far beyond the police brutality that ended the lives of... Read more

Opinion

Popping the Georgetown Bubble

"My classmates would walk around with thousand-dollar winter coats, wear designer bags, and avoid Leo’s at their every convenience. Meanwhile, I added three jobs to my plate and was juggling more than I could handle. Going from classes in Walsh to shifts in Reynolds (a hike), I often found it near impossible to ever leave the Bubble or even to discover any clubs I was passionate about."

Opinion

I’m a survivor. And no, your policies aren’t enough.

"Georgetown and its students say survivors are not alone. We write it on the walls of our buildings and host rallies and shout together, but what will you do when the perpetrator is your friend or partner? What will you do when rejecting them means a major change in your life? What will you do when empowering a survivor is inconvenient for you? What will you do when your student organization is enabling abusers? What action will you actually, truly take to make sure a survivor is not alone?"

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: The dangers of the news using war metaphors

In discussions about COVID-19, it is the military metaphors that are the most dangerous. War metaphors related to COVID-19 are overused and often inaccurate, and descriptions of the pandemic should instead turn to non-violent metaphors that emphasize the need for community and perseverance.

Opinion

Threading: How my eyebrows have been a window to my soul

No matter the answer, my previous “cure” for my hair was one of many small things I took for granted, and one of the many small habits that I, like many others, didn’t realize I valued until they were gone.

Editorials

Black Lives Matter: Defund police, confront racism at home and at Georgetown

So long as racism continues to exist in our society, we carry the moral imperative to correct it.

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: What fall 2020 means for LGBTQ+ students

College campuses create an environment where LGBTQ+ students can live openly, build a community, and finally accept themselves. If Georgetown forces students to continue taking virtual classes this fall, Georgetown strips queer students of the experience they signed up for. This would stifle the thriving LGBTQ+ community, of all races and classes, that I have been able to learn, live, and grow with. LGBTQ+ students need the support a college campus provides.

Voices

The Gates-way to discovery

“So it’s been dormant for 5000 years? If that thing erupts, I’m gonna be furious.” I laughed at this witty exchange, having stopped flipping channels to check out an episode... Read more

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: Domestic violence and the danger at home

Stay home. For most of us, it’s the one thing we can do to save lives from the reach of COVID-19—to do our part for society when so many others are risking their lives by going to work for us. For some, however, staying home is more dangerous than contracting the disease. Due to this pandemic, as well as the financial strain many families are facing, domestic violence cases have spiked nationally. This is how we can begin to help.

Opinion

Black lives don’t matter—that’s why we’re protesting

I’m tired of Black lives not mattering. I’m tired of seeing people who look like me die. I’m tired of having to educate our “allies” on how to show up for our community. I’m tired of knowing my children will have to modify every aspect of their behavior and mannerisms to ensure they aren’t misconstrued as threatening. They’ll have to grow up too fast and give up pieces of their childhood for their own safety. I’m tired of your complacency. I’m tired of wondering if I’m next.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: A Buddhist Approach to Pandemic Grocery Shopping

"The stressful process of grocery shopping and coronavirus-induced anxiety, in general, may reduce our ability to think clearly, but Buddhism can provide insight into managing our thoughts and actions."

Voices

Quarantine mindfulness for generally flawed, very scared people like me

I’ve rarely studied meditation in a formal sense, but the basis of mindfulness critical to its practice have always been an important part of my personal philosophy. For someone who has often struggled to feel in control in uncontrollable environments, mindfulness is an essential tool.

Editorials

Prepare for nationwide vote-by-mail, before it’s too late

For a democracy to work, its citizens must be guaranteed the ability to participate in free and fair elections. Maintaining this guarantee while still requiring people to physically appear at... Read more

Editorials

Don’t leave Tara Reade behind

Content Warning: This article discusses sexual assault and the treatment of survivors.  In early March, Tara Reade accused former vice-president and likely Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden of sexually assaulting... Read more

Voices

One in the one-in-three

That night, I became one of the one-in-three women who has experienced sexual assault or coercion—without even realizing it. Yet despite our prevalence and the gravity of our circumstances, policymakers—like Betsy DeVos' new Title IX policies—continue to neither recognize nor support survivors of sexual assault. 

Editorials

Congress’ economic relief bill fails undocumented immigrants, students

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus has caused businesses to close, students to finish the school year at home, and over 36 million people to either lose their source of... Read more

Voices

Carrying On: 38 days and not counting at the Tombs

"In February, I accepted the Tombs’ annual challenge for seniors. On every one of the last 99 days of senior year, I planned to descend into the Tombs and hand the bartender my ID as proof of my attendance. I found the cheapest items on the menu and set aside enough money for all the checks. If you make it, they’ll put your name on a plaque, and how can you put a dollar value on that?"