Columns

Recurring contributions from the opinions section.



Voices

When Neutrality Isn’t Enough: Exploring multipartiality in the classroom

Implementing multipartiality provides participants with a consideration of counter narratives, as well as a consideration of why these perspectives are so often suppressed. This question of “why?” provides insight as to the function of larger structures, including the education system itself. 

Carrying On

How I came to identify as disabled after a decade with mental illness

This process of self-shaming and hiding ate at me—until I began to identify as disabled.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: Aid disparities put graduate students in financial binds

When it comes to pandemic aid, Georgetown graduate students are seriously undervalued relative to undergraduates in the eyes of the administration.

Voices

Skip your red meat burger. Save the Earth.

Ideally, we'd systematically eliminate red meat entirely. Environment health depends on it. But this isn't an ideal world—so let's do the next best thing.

Voices

Carrying On: One Foot in the Promised Land

"There will probably never be a day when I wake up, look in the mirror, and see the face of a Jew or a non-Jew. The face will always be just a little bit of both, somewhere in between."

Alumni Speak

I was a poll worker during COVID: Here’s why I’m worried for November’s election

The protocols in place worked for our small election, with only 1-2 voters per hour. However, much higher turnout in November will complicate that, especially with the convergence of voters from all parties.

Carrying On

Carrying On: What COVID-19 taught me about class and my classmates

"It would be a mistake to assume that COVID-19 has created these gaps in educational access. All it’s done is bring them to light."

Voices

Carrying On: Becoming friends at a distance

Amanda Chu and Natalie Chaudhuri tell the fabled story of their friendship—from proseminar classmates to Voices editors to quarantine best friends.

Alumni Speak

Why Georgetown students should support D.C. statehood

D.C. statehood is not an issue of just taxes or borders. Civil rights, racial justice, and democracy are at stake. Statehood would open up pathways for the 700,000 residents of D.C., 54 percent of whom are people of color, to advocate for themselves and access the same democratic processes that people living in states do.

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: How COVID-19 affects international graduate students

"In light of these struggles, the COVID-19 pandemic has made me question the university’s real commitment to the global character it parades around."

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: The dangers of the news using war metaphors

In discussions about COVID-19, it is the military metaphors that are the most dangerous. War metaphors related to COVID-19 are overused and often inaccurate, and descriptions of the pandemic should instead turn to non-violent metaphors that emphasize the need for community and perseverance.

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: What fall 2020 means for LGBTQ+ students

College campuses create an environment where LGBTQ+ students can live openly, build a community, and finally accept themselves. If Georgetown forces students to continue taking virtual classes this fall, Georgetown strips queer students of the experience they signed up for. This would stifle the thriving LGBTQ+ community, of all races and classes, that I have been able to learn, live, and grow with. LGBTQ+ students need the support a college campus provides.

Voices

The Gates-way to discovery

“So it’s been dormant for 5000 years? If that thing erupts, I’m gonna be furious.” I laughed at this witty exchange, having stopped flipping channels to check out an episode... Read more

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: Domestic violence and the danger at home

Stay home. For most of us, it’s the one thing we can do to save lives from the reach of COVID-19—to do our part for society when so many others are risking their lives by going to work for us. For some, however, staying home is more dangerous than contracting the disease. Due to this pandemic, as well as the financial strain many families are facing, domestic violence cases have spiked nationally. This is how we can begin to help.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: A Buddhist Approach to Pandemic Grocery Shopping

"The stressful process of grocery shopping and coronavirus-induced anxiety, in general, may reduce our ability to think clearly, but Buddhism can provide insight into managing our thoughts and actions."

Voices

Carrying On: 38 days and not counting at the Tombs

"In February, I accepted the Tombs’ annual challenge for seniors. On every one of the last 99 days of senior year, I planned to descend into the Tombs and hand the bartender my ID as proof of my attendance. I found the cheapest items on the menu and set aside enough money for all the checks. If you make it, they’ll put your name on a plaque, and how can you put a dollar value on that?"

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: What COVID-19 reminded me about being a first-gen student

Last week, I finished my second year at Georgetown. As much as I wish I could provide some eloquent update about how, despite the obstacles created by COVID-19, I made the most of this semester and learned a lot, that simply isn’t the case. The reality is I’m tired. I’m really tired. I’m tired because I’ve spent every day for the past two months thinking about the fact that Georgetown doesn’t seem to consider me, a first-generation student, valuable.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: This Virus Has No Race

"With the rise in anti-Asian sentiment, I can’t help but feel uneasy in the rare times I do leave my house since the stay-at-home orders began. I wonder if the man who pushes his cart past mine in the supermarket sees me and feels hate. I worry if today might be the day some crazed stranger passes me or my family and reacts violently. "

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: Instagram Activism Ignores Gendered Impacts of COVID-19

"The disparity between the facile attempts at female empowerment on Instagram and the ways women’s rights are under threat demonstrates how misdirected good intentions can actually be more harmful than empowering."

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: What the Coronavirus Outbreak Reveals About Ableism at Georgetown

"Our schools’ new policies reveal that professors’ lack of support for disabled students exists not because of “lazy” students, but because of a lack of empathy and the excessive competitiveness that institutions such as Georgetown instill in their community members."