On The Pandemic


On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: How COVID-19 affects international graduate students

"In light of these struggles, the COVID-19 pandemic has made me question the university’s real commitment to the global character it parades around."

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: The dangers of the news using war metaphors

In discussions about COVID-19, it is the military metaphors that are the most dangerous. War metaphors related to COVID-19 are overused and often inaccurate, and descriptions of the pandemic should instead turn to non-violent metaphors that emphasize the need for community and perseverance.

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: What fall 2020 means for LGBTQ+ students

College campuses create an environment where LGBTQ+ students can live openly, build a community, and finally accept themselves. If Georgetown forces students to continue taking virtual classes this fall, Georgetown strips queer students of the experience they signed up for. This would stifle the thriving LGBTQ+ community, of all races and classes, that I have been able to learn, live, and grow with. LGBTQ+ students need the support a college campus provides.

On The Pandemic

On The Pandemic: Domestic violence and the danger at home

Stay home. For most of us, it’s the one thing we can do to save lives from the reach of COVID-19—to do our part for society when so many others are risking their lives by going to work for us. For some, however, staying home is more dangerous than contracting the disease. Due to this pandemic, as well as the financial strain many families are facing, domestic violence cases have spiked nationally. This is how we can begin to help.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: A Buddhist Approach to Pandemic Grocery Shopping

"The stressful process of grocery shopping and coronavirus-induced anxiety, in general, may reduce our ability to think clearly, but Buddhism can provide insight into managing our thoughts and actions."

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: What COVID-19 reminded me about being a first-gen student

Last week, I finished my second year at Georgetown. As much as I wish I could provide some eloquent update about how, despite the obstacles created by COVID-19, I made the most of this semester and learned a lot, that simply isn’t the case. The reality is I’m tired. I’m really tired. I’m tired because I’ve spent every day for the past two months thinking about the fact that Georgetown doesn’t seem to consider me, a first-generation student, valuable.

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: This Virus Has No Race

"With the rise in anti-Asian sentiment, I can’t help but feel uneasy in the rare times I do leave my house since the stay-at-home orders began. I wonder if the man who pushes his cart past mine in the supermarket sees me and feels hate. I worry if today might be the day some crazed stranger passes me or my family and reacts violently. "

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: Instagram Activism Ignores Gendered Impacts of COVID-19

"The disparity between the facile attempts at female empowerment on Instagram and the ways women’s rights are under threat demonstrates how misdirected good intentions can actually be more harmful than empowering."

On The Pandemic

On the Pandemic: What the Coronavirus Outbreak Reveals About Ableism at Georgetown

"Our schools’ new policies reveal that professors’ lack of support for disabled students exists not because of “lazy” students, but because of a lack of empathy and the excessive competitiveness that institutions such as Georgetown instill in their community members."